6 links for the week and 1 from the past: 29/7/12

6 Links for the week and one from the past – 15/7/12

6 of the week and 1 from the past: 8/7/12

It’s an idea that many people do, and this far from original. It will explain a bit of my thinking and influences, though, and hopefully give you something else to read.

Every Sunday, I will post 6 links and 1 photo of things i’ve found interesting this week. If you follow me on Twitter then you’ll probably see the favourites when I click the star on Google Reader, retweets as I retweet them, or favourites if you post it.

So, for the week ending 8/7/12

1.How to make boring things interesting in video

Adam Westbrook explains his 6 steps to making a video interesting, which should be required reading for all video journalists or producers creating video for their websites.

2. Top tips: Shooting summer events

The Guardian takes a look at the 10 top tips they believe will help you get the most from shooting summer events. They include advice on thinking which kit to take, and checking the weather. Simple, but needed.

3. My first e-book: scraping for journalists (and programming too)

Paul Bradshaw taught me many things about data journalism when on the City University MA Interactive Journalism course, and here he is teaching everyone else. It’s released next week, so sign up, and read it if you think you can find a use for it in your newsroom (clue: you can)

4. New working papers launched: ‘Justice Wide Open’

An important series of papers about open justice were launched this week from City University. They say:

The new collection of working papers is part of a wider project encouraging ‘Open Justice in the Digital Era‘. The issues are extensive and diverse: the recommendations of the government’s ‘secret justice’ green paper, now the Justice & Security bill, which would see more cases behind closed doors; the decline in local and national court reporting as a result of cuts in journalism; the courts’ barriers to entry due to ill-informed staff; and the difficulties in obtaining free legal information.

In the first section on the tradition and context of open justice, Geoffrey Robertson QC, the keynote speaker at the event, sets out the history of the principle and argues that the government’s Justice and Security recommendations are simply not compatible.

The Master of the Rolls, Lord Neuberger, examines the way in which open justice is important and underpins our society amongst others.

5. Neal Mann & Simon Rogers on social media and datajournalism at Activate

Martin Belam, Lead UX & Information Architect at The Guardian, details what Neal Mann (@fieldproducer, who recently left Sky News) and Simon Rogers (Editor of the Guardian Datastore) think are the ways technology has changed how they work as journalists.

6. Meet data mapping platform CartoDB

Data Driven Journalism introduces us to new mapping tool, CartoDB. They say users “have more freedom to customise their data, for example they can choose how much data is displayed and how it is shown.”

It aims to give journalists the right tools to work with journalism every day – but with Google Fusion Tables already very easy to use, will it make a difference?

And the final part, one photograph from the archives. I use my archives on Flickr.com mainly, so browse there for interesting stuff I’ve taken in the past.

Madoc Street In The Rain

From 2008, but could as well as have been from this week.

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I hope you enjoyed this weeks look back.

6 of the week and 1 from the past: 1/7/12

It’s an idea that many people do, and this far from original. It will explain a bit of my thinking and influences, though, and hopefully give you something else to read.

Every Sunday, I will post 6 links and 1 photo of things i’ve found interesting this week. If you follow me on Twitter then you’ll probably see the favourites when I click the star on Google Reader, retweets as I retweet them, or favourites if you post it.

So, here goes.

1. Does the traditional bootcamp style of journalism education need a bohemian makeover?

Ross Hawkes takes a look at the traditional way of teaching journalism in university, and asks if it needs a makeover. He says:

for the print/digital side of the profession where more opportunities exist for new forms of reporting, there is certainly some ground to ensure that we’re not stifling storytellers by bogging them down with an unnecessary skillset.

2. What happens when you post your status from the wrong account?

Jonathan Jacob takes a quick look at why controlling multiple social media accounts on one device can lead to confusion, and errors – but that sometimes it can also (kind of) work in your favour.

3. #Realtalk for the j-school graduate on the first five years of your career

Something interesting for many of the graduates from journalism school, including me, on how the Nieman Journalism Lab thinks you should act in the five years after leaving. Some good tips in it, including

Mess around with new reading apps, new blogging platforms, new social media sites. You don’t have to use all of these things every day, but you need to be familiar with them. One of your main selling points as a newbie journalist is that you’re “hip” to the “Internet sites” and “gadgets” that “the young people” are using today. Deliver on that stereotype.

4. FileMaker Bento 4, reviewed on reghardware.com

A way to keep track of what you have, what payments you have made, expenses, wages, time, etc. A great app to help iPad wielding journalists keep track of themselves, essentially.

5. Thoughts on changing times for journalism and newspapers

Alison Gow (Editor of the Daily Post) has a request for editors out there to help her by telling her what they do in a day, and how the job has changed, for her MA study.

6. Big weather stories: 16 digital tips and tools for when the rain falls/floods rise/gales blast/snow hits

One to keep in mind for when the next batch of snow and rain arrives, probably mid August the way the summers going. However, it’s some of the tools in it, such as iWitness, are great for general use – iWitness maybe more so for the live tracking. Definitely grab reporters out of the newsroom and make sure they know what these are.

And the final part, one photograph from the archives. I use my archives on Flickr.com mainly, so browse there for interesting stuff I’ve taken in the past.

Pier Before Sunrise

What Llandudno looks like at 4:30am in the middle of June. Taken in 2007.

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I hope this works out. Let me know in the comments if you found the links interesting.